Alternate content for script Text Only VersionSkip to Main Content

Summer Course Descriptions

Rosemont College has two Undergraduate Summer Sessions.  The course list for both, including times and instructors, are listed hereDirect your questions to the Paulette Hutchinson, dean of the Undergraduate College at phutchinson@rosemont.edu or 610-527-0200 x2381.

REGISTER


Course Descriptions

ACC 0100 - Financial Accounting I

An introduction to the theory and fundamental concepts of the financial reporting process in modern business organizations. The course focuses on the accrual method of accounting and an introduction to GAAP theory. Topics covered include analyzing and recording business transactions, periodic determination of income and financial position, and preparation and understanding of financial statements.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


BUS 0220 - Statistics I

An introduction to statistics, including descriptive statistics (measures of central tendency, dispersion, and frequency distributions) graphic presentations, Probability Theory, Sampling Theory, normal curve applications and the use of computers. Emphasis given to interpretation and application of descriptive statistics. For students in business, economics, and accounting.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


 BUS 0250 - Sport Management

This course is an analysis of effective management strategies and the body of knowledge associated with pursuing a career in sport management. The course introduces the student to sport management career opportunities in the sport industry and to sport principles as they apply to management, leadership style, communication, and motivation.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


BUS 0395 – Advertising

An introduction to the theories and principles of advertising with a focus on current practice in advertising agencies. Topics include advertising foundations, planning and strategy, advertising media, advertising campaign strategy and an evaluation of commercials (print, television, radio, and Internet).

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


COM 0237 - Information Gathering

This course introduces Communication majors to the types of research and information gathering skills essential for journalists, public relations practitioners, and other professionals. It will include a review of sources available in the library, computer resources, and municipal, state and federal government documents.

In addition to becoming skilled seekers in the digital/paper chase, students will gain an overview of the “right to access” issues, including the Freedom of Information Act and the ethics of privacy. In short, students will learn strategies for gathering information and critically analyzing it.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


COM 0279 - Communication Media Ethics

An examination of the ethical challenges that confront communication professionals, whether in print, broadcast or Internet journalism, public relations or advertising. Students learn to discern a wide variety of ethical issues concerning communication behavior, apply systematic ethical analysis to various communication situations and explain their analyses clearly.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


ECO 0106 – Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic theories which explain the workings of the marketplace in a capitalist system. Topics include the behavior of consumers, businesses, the public sector, labor market, discrimination, poverty, and pollution. Course emphasizes techniques of analysis that will continue to be useful in comprehending a changing economic world. No co-requisite. Business students should register for this section of Microeconomics.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


EDU 0427 - Technology in the Curriculum

A lecture and hands-on approach to understanding the computer and its application in the classroom. No prior computer knowledge or skill is necessary.

 

Prerequisites: limited to Education majors; EDU-0201
1.5 credits.


ENG 0200 - Studies in Poetry

A study of the techniques and types of poetry and how to read them. The course concentrates on the intricacies of this art form by examining large quantities of traditional and contemporary verse. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


ENG 0221 - Development of the American Novel

A study of selected American novels from Susannah Rowson’s Charlotte Temple to Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


FRE 0100 - Introductory French I

An introduction to a practical beginning language experience, enriched with extensive cultural materials. Designed for students preparing degrees in art history, European history, business, international affairs, and the traveler.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


LAT 0100 - Introductory Latin I

The study of Latin is designed to lay the groundwork for Latin grammar and vocabulary, as well as for Roman culture. In addition, students of Latin increase their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar. Offered during spring and fall semesters.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


MAT 0115 - College Algebra

Topics include properties of real numbers; linear, quadratic and higher degree polynomials; logarithmic and exponential functions. There is an emphasis on the graphs of these functions. Offered fall and spring semesters.

Prerequisite: MAT-0112 or placement.
3 credits


MAT 0116 – Precalculus

Precalculus is the study of the ratios (functions called sines, cosines, tangents, etc.) of the lengths of sides in right triangles. Angles are often measured in radians. Graphs of the functions are studied. The ratios are related to each other in “Identities”. The ratios are applied to non-right angle triangles. This knowledge is used to break lines into vertical and horizontal components called vectors.

Prerequisite: MAT-0115 or the equivalent.
3 credits


PSC 0103 - Introduction to American Politics

Analysis of how the American Government works and why it works the way it does. We will consider what problems we think our government should solve and how it should solve those problems. We will examine the principal institutions of American Government: The Presidency, Congress, the Court system, the media, political parties, interest groups and elections. Each student will pick a current issue of special interest and follow it for the semester.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


PSY 0100 - Basic Concepts in Psychology

An introductory course designed to make students aware of the diversity of the field of Psychology and the ways in which human behavior can be studied. Goals, methods, and applications of the science of psychology in learning, language, thinking, perception, and the emotions are investigated.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


RST 0124 - World Religions

A survey of the major world religions, primarily Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will cover the origins, development, major religious beliefs and practices, and the contemporary status of each of these religions. Students will also reflect about the encounters between these religions, especially the prospect for inter-religious dialogue.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


RST 0250 - Christian Ethics

This course is a study of Christian ethics—its nature and character, historical background, and contemporary questions—with a focus on issues of social justice. We will examine ways in which the dignity of individuals and communities is honored and empowered. Areas to receive particular attention include: the environment, racism, and gender.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


SOC 0110 - Social Problems

Appreciation of how “social problems” are defined by culture. Areas studied: (1) the city (urban change); (2) healthcare; (3) family disorganization; (4) labeling of sexual behavior; (5) individual and organized crime; (6) juvenile delinquency; (7) life-cycle problems; (8) substance use – drugs, alcohol, smoking; (9) war and terrorism; (10) secrecy and privacy; (11) poverty; (12) environmental issues.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


SOC 0285 - Sex Roles and Human Sexuality

Theories, concepts, and research in human sexuality. Topics include: socio-historical perspectives; life cycle changes; sexual communication; love/attitudes/intimacy patterns in American culture; gender roles and sexual dysfunction; religiosity; sex and the legal system; sex education; and trends in sexual attitudes and behavior.

Prerequisite: SOC 0100
3 credits


SOC 0360 – Seminar on Marriage, Family and Intimate Relationships

Topics: universality of the family; trends in marriage; class differentials; spousal selection; conflict resolution; alternative family styles; intimacy patterns; cohabitation; communication models; modification of husband-wife roles; social interventions with families; the effects of separation/divorce on children; new custodial arrangements; and decision making in intimate relationships.

Prerequisite: SOC 0100
3 credits


SOC 0385 – Animals, Society and Human Interaction

The course will explore the study of the relationship between animals and humans throughout social history; how domestication has coincided with social evolution; the role of animal companions in the lives of individuals and families; treatment of animals as a reflection of culture; animals and physical/social/emotional help; visits to settings where animals are employed as therapeutic agents; the role of animals in personal and societal security; animal communication patterns and capacities.

Prerequisites: None
3 credits


WRT 0170 – Advanced Composition and Oral Presentation Skills

In Advanced Composition and Oral Communication, students will build upon the writing, research, and analytical skills he/she developed in First-Year Writing. Through a consideration of a range of genres, styles, and audiences, students will use their critical-thinking and research skills to craft both written and oral arguments. Assignments will include papers, short writing assignments, oral presentations, and a final group project.

Prerequisite: WRT 0110
3 credits


 WRT 0210 - Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Creative Writing – Nonfiction teaches students how to write effective prose in the genre popularly referred to as Creative Nonfiction. In this class, students will analyze the work of established creative nonfiction writers and then build upon that research through writing their own creative nonfiction.

Through class discussions, workshops and conferences, students will also learn how to give and receive productive feedback on the creative nonfiction of their peers and how to submit their work for publication.

Prerequisite: WRT-0110 or POI
3 credits