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Three-Week Courses

Each three-week course is $45. All courses meet in the Kaul Hall Forum Classroom.

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The Art and Craft of Memoir
Presenter: Martha Jablow
Presenter: Martha Jablow, BA
Wednesdays, April 1st, 8th, and 15th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

When Mary Karr's The Liar’s Club was published in 1995, it set off a boom of memoirs. Why are memoirs so popular? How do they differ from autobiography? Everyone has life experiences that can tell a unique story, but what makes one memoir engaging and another one boring?

Whether you enjoy reading memoirs or want to write your own, this course will examine how language and writing style can bring a memoir to life. It will present examples from successful memoirs: Harry Crews’ A Childhood, Vivian Gornick’s Fierce Attachments, and Karr’s The Liar’s Club. Participants are invited to bring in samples of their own memoirs-in-progress.


Intro to Archaeology
Presenter: Nick Eiteljorg
Thursdays, March 26th, April 2nd and April 9th from 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

The course will consist of three lectures about archaeology: one a general introduction and one each about projects on which the instructor has worked - one an excavation in the Etruscan cemetery in Orvieto, Italy, and the second on the Athenian Acropolis (an excavation of the entrance structure before the Classical building and a long-term study of the Classical entrance building).


What the Fudge!
Presenter: Celeste Yvette Bailey
Fridays, April 17th, 24th and 26th from 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

As adults, many of us have not mastered the ins and outs and ups and downs of our credit. Credit is an issue that everyone wants to know the truth about because it really does have a huge impact on your way of life. Are you tired of paying high interest rates or being rejected for loans? Do you know your credit score?

Do you know what it means to your wallet? We will be exploring the avenues taken to build credit when you have none, phase one. Phase two focuses on maintaining a good credit score and the last phase covers how to repair your credit if you have stumbled a bit on your credit journey. A fun and interactive time for all.


Mysterious Offerings: “Who You Gonna Call?”
Presenter: Meredith Baird
Tuesdays, April 14th, 21st, and 28th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Literary detectives are usually the cream of the crop, but even the most canny detective can be stumped when thrown into an unfamiliar situation.  Enter the expert. Whether invited by the police or running an unwelcome “shadow” investigation, the experts bring the knowledge and/or skills which can crack a case wide open.

The introduction of a modality other than routine detective work can infuse a novel with fresh energy, diversity, and dimension. Join us as we read and discuss three character-driven mystery novels featuring assistance from adjunct professionals including a psychotherapist, a forensic archeologist, and an Inuit arctic hunting guide.

Blue Monday by Nicci French
April 21:The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths
April 28:  White Heat by M. J. McGrath


Intro to Archaeology
Presenter: Nick Eiteljorg, PhD
Fridays, April 24th, May 1st and 8th from 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

The course will consist of three lectures about archaeology: one a general introduction and one each about projects on which the instructor has worked - one an excavation in the Etruscan cemetery in Orvieto, Italy, and the second on the Athenian Acropolis (an excavation of the entrance structure before the Classical building and a long-term study of the Classical entrance building).


Garden School: Adventures in Ecological Gardening
Presenter: Neeti Bathala, Ph.D.
Wednesdays, April 29th, May 6th, and 13th from 1:00 p.m – 2:30 p.m.

As we approach the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, this three-part series will explore manners in which we can contribute to the environmental movement in our own backyard. This course will introduce basic horticultural and ecological principles. What is a plant, what is a habitat, and what makes a ‘wildlife-friendly garden’? We will explore the concept of garden design. After introducing a selection of native and pollinator friendly plants appropriate for our region, we will discuss how to scale our ideas from a plot of land to small space or container gardens.


French Exceptionalism
Presenter: Thérѐse Casadesus Rawson, PhD
Wednesdays May 7th, 14th, and 21st from 10:00 a.m. — 11:30 a.m.

The course will be part lecture on current events and part powerpoint presentation on historical highlights responsible for this concept. As a class, we will explore and discuss French exceptionalism and it’s impact on international interactions.


Oops… Anybody Can Make a Mistake
Presenter: Joseph J. Hylan, Esq.
Tuesdays, May 5th, 12th, and 19th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Since the enactment and ratification of the United States Constitution in 1788, the United States Supreme Court has made decisions that, for the most part, have bent the arc of the law toward human freedom and social justice… but not always.

The course will carefully consider and explain those Supreme Court decisions that were not the Court’s finest hours. Further, the course will consider those constitutional blunders and how, and by what means, those blunders were recalculated, reconsidered, and remedied.